May 23, 2017 Uncategorised No Comments

Echidnas all overechidnawatch_logo

From Cairns in the north to Girraween in the south, and everywhere in between, Queensland’s EchidnaWatchers have been keeping a sharp lookout.
With reports coming from locations as varied as Brisbane’s inner suburb Holland Park and Cunnamulla, western Queensland, echidnas are living up to their reputation of being Australia’s most widespread mammal.

What are we finding?

Happily, most EchidnaWatch sightings are of live animals (almost three-quarters of all reports). However, all but 4 of the dead echidnas were reported as road kill, an indicator of the impact traffic has on wildlife.

Echidnas of all ages have been reported, even puggles (baby echidnas), which is uncommon as they are often hidden away in burrows. However, the reports of dead young are a concern and EchidnaWatch will continue to monitor this information. The vast majority of sightings are of adults, which is to be expected.

What are echidnas doing?

We’ve had no reports of bungy-jumping echidnas so far, but otherwise Queensland’s echidnas seem to be leading active lives. Echidnas have been reported walking up the Bruce Highway, swimming across Platypus Bay towards Fraser Island, and even crossing the runway at Gold Coast Airport.

Strange sighting: An EchidnaWatcher visiting the Alpha Showgrounds in Central Queensland saw an echidna busily making a burrow out in the open at the entrance to the toilet block.

Reported sightings 2000 – current

Size

Alive

Dead

Total

Puggle

71%

29%

2%

Immature

82%

18%

15%

Adult

66%

34%

43%

Unknown

76%

24%

40%

Total

72%

28%

100%

Note: This is an extract from the EchidnaWatch database

Effective EchidnaWatching tips

Be sure to provide as much information as possible on your sighting form because it helps us build up a picture of what is happening with echidna populations.

  • Postcode. Remember to tell us the postcode of your sighting, it will help us map populations.
  • Habitat. Use the drop down list to tell us the habitat where you saw your echidna. If that habitat-type isn’t listed, tell us what it was. With this kind of information we can start to assess whether echidnas are being found in a wider range of habitat than might be expected, or whether perhaps they are travelling through less suitable areas because appropriate habitat is being fragmented.

Read more about Wildlife Queensland’s EchidnaWatch program.

For more information on WPSQ’s projects, email or phone +61 (7) 3844 0129.

Written by wildlife1ict