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Let's hope our ancestors' enjoyment of Australian aquatic life won't rely solely on aquariums. Sea Life Sydney Aquarium, Darling Harbour. - Photo © Sacha Fernandez

For reasons best known to the Abbott government, the closing date Our marine life relies on the protection of Commonwealth marine reserves nation-wide. – Photo © Sam Harris for submissions of public opinion on the Coral Sea and North Network marine reserves has been extended until Tuesday, 31 March 2015. In 2012 Australia’s largest network …

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Volunteer placement student, Ahlia Karam explains the importance of nest boxes as habitat replacement for gliders in the Greenwood Lakes area - Photo © Matt Cecil

Wildlife Queensland’s Glider Network (QGN) recently shared the WPSQ Senior Projects Officer, Matt Cecil (back row, centre) and volunteer placement student, Ahlia Karam (front row, far right) with visiting delegation of Chinese State Forestry Administration professionals at Greenwood Lakes. – Photo © Matt Cecil importance of conservation with a delegation of Chinese State Forestry Administration …

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Bridled nailtail wallaby, Onychogalea frae - Photo ©  Steve Parish

Bridled nailtail wallaby, Onychogalea frae – Photo © Steve Parish WPSQ has received several enquiries about how to become a member of Friends of Taunton. Following discussions and agreement between Wildlife Queensland and the Department of National Parks, Sport and Racing, the answer is simple: all you have to do is contact Leanne Henry, NRM …

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Smiles all 'round as WPSQ presents funds raised by its recent appeal for the bridled nailtail wallaby at David Fleay Wildlife Park, Gold Coast - Photo © Department of National Parks, Sport and Racing

There were smiles all ’round on Tuesday 10 March as Wildlife Smiles all ’round as WPSQ presents funds raised by its recent appeal for the bridled nailtail wallaby at David Fleay Wildlife Park, Gold Coast – Photo © Department of National Parks, Sport and Racing Queensland President Peter Ogilvie, Secretary Des Boyland and Councillor Lynn …

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Branch members battle the plastic litter problem reflected in the 2014 Clean Up Rubbish Report - Photo © Steve Homewood

Sunday, 1 March marked the 25th anniversary of Clean Up Australia Wildlife Queensland’s Bayside Branch members clean up Australia in Redland Bay – Photo © Steve Homewood Day, an annual event at which hundreds of thousands of volunteers collect the litter from their local environment. (In the case of many Wildlife Queensland Branches and catchment …

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Crocodile management in Queensland is a vexed issue, particularly on the heavily populated east coast of north Queensland; it is an ongoing source of controversy, dissention and strident demands for increased or changed actions by government. That the dissatisfaction continues is proof enough that present policies and their implemented actions are not working.

The Queensland government has two fundamental but inherently contradictory responsibilities relating to crocodiles: an obligation to conserve them, as well as an obligation to keep people safe from them.
•The obligation to conserve crocodiles derives from the Nature Conservation Act 1992 and through Australian government legislation and international agreements. Crocodile conservation in Queensland includes the need to protect them from being killed illegally for sport or profit, and is set against a background of the wholesale, unregulated slaughter that decimated their populations until they were protected by law in the early 1970s.
•The obligation to protect people from harm has to accommodate and accept the realisation that it is neither practical nor economically feasible to ensure complete safety from crocodiles in and around natural waters in northern Queensland. Risk can be minimised but never removed completely.

Addressing these responsibilities adequately is not trivial in a state as large and complex (physically, biologically and politically) as Queensland. But other governments in Australia and overseas have similar responsibilities and many handle them well. The international effort in crocodile conservation and management over recent decades is justifiably regarded as a significant success story.

Wildlife Queensland appreciates that humans take precedence and, in human populated areas adjacent to native reserves, crocodile extraction and relocation is often required to ensure public safety. But crocodiles have the same right to live as other animals and even people. The policies and management currently implemented require additional alterations to be fair to both humans and these large reptiles.

The current code of practice for taking, handling and transportation of crocodiles is under review. The previous government's privatisation of crocodile removal produced a service that was less than transparent regarding where captured crocodiles ended up, went over-budget and was overly rigid concerning techniques implemented. According to the Cairns Post on 14 February 2015, an ill-equipped Dawul Wuru Indigenous Corporation (DWIC) was awarded the contract in 2013 ahead of experienced field experts, without any public communication about the proceedings. Allegedly, the private contractors then had to borrow resources from government departments and failed to disclose the nature of disposal procedures for captured crocodiles. One may even surmise that this contract was the equivalent of an unrestricted, unregulated 'license to kill' crocodiles.

Crocodile management in Queensland is a vexed issue, particularly on the heavily populated east coast of north Queensland; it is an ongoing source of controversy, dissention and strident demands for increased or changed actions by government. That the dissatisfaction continues is proof enough that present policies and their implemented actions are not working. Crocodiles have …

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Thumbs_up

Hon Dr Steven Miles MP, Minister for the Environment and Heritage Protection, Minister for National Parks and the Great Barrier Reef, is off to a flying start after the recent state election. A meeting with 24 state, national and regional conservation groups was held on 26 February 2015 to discuss a range of topics including …

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Tubastrea yellow tube coral by night - Great Barrier Reef- Photo © Peter Nangle

Australia’s network of Commonwealth marine reserves is under review by the Abbott Government putting at risk the adequate protection of these environments and their biodiversity established by the previous Labor Government. Coral Sea Commonwealth Marine Reserve – Photo © www.environment.gov.au In 2012 the Labor Federal Government established Australia’s network of Commonwealth marine reserves – the …

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turtlewithplasticbag

Join Wildlife Queensland’s campaign for a Wildlife Queensland has taken over the QCC campaign to ban and restrict single-use plastic bags in Queensland. We want to see a ban put in place and this election is the opportunity to get all political parties to make that commitment. Wildlife Queensland is calling for all seven political …

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Greenslogo

The environmental policies espoused by the Australian Greens are well documented. While not currently represented in the Queensland Parliament the party’s performance in the Federal Parliament clearly demonstrates that they practice what they preach. Significant issues for the Greens include: Action on climate change The Greens recognise climate change as the biggest threat to our …

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