Bank Australia's support will contribute greatly to the RBCN's project to link northern and southern Richmond birdwing populations in Queensland.
July 26, 2018 Latest News No Comments
Bank Australia's support will contribute greatly to the RBCN's project to link northern and southern Richmond birdwing populations in Queensland.

Bank Australia’s support will contribute greatly to the RBCN’s project to link northern and southern Richmond birdwing populations in Queensland.

Wildlife Queensland’s Richmond Birdwing Conservation Network is proud to have been selected as one of 12 recipients of a Bank Australia 2018 Customer Grant.

Last month, 12 Bank Australia community customers received grants totaling $110,000 for projects designed to create positive social and environmental change. Among them was our Richmond Birdwing Conservation Network (RBCN), grateful beneficiary of $7,500 to help plant a corridor of birdwing butterfly vines between Samford and Woodford in south-east Queensland.

Bank Australia’s Managing Director Damien Walsh said that the bank’s customers had demonstrated a desire for the Bank to act on issues like environmental conservation and renewable energy, family and gendered violence, reconciliation, disability inclusion, educational disadvantage and refugees.

“We’re proud to be able to support these 12 organisations to deliver projects that will create positive social and environmental impact across Australia. Our 2018 grants program received many high quality applications, making our final decision a tough one,” said Mr Walsh.

Receiving the grant on behalf of Wildlife Queensland, Projects Manager Matt Cecil said that it was “a significant outcome for the continued recovery of the Richmond birdwing butterfly.”

“This grant will fund the purchase of no less than 1000 birdwing butterfly vines for the development of this important habitat corridor,” he said.

Planting of the vines is scheduled to commence in April 2019 and the RBCN will most likely reach out to Bank Australia employees to invite them to come along and ‘get their hands dirty’.

As many hands make lighter work, planting events will also be open to volunteer participation – keep an eye out for your chance to be part of the RBCN’s ongoing recovery of one of Australia’s largest and most vulnerable butterfly species, the Richmond birdwing.

 

Written by Wildlifeqld